Woven Wings Yak Blend Review

Because this song should be stuck in your head.

If you don't have a sleeping baby beside you, haven't promised your partner that no, you're not doing "more wrap stuff", or aren't pretending to do work within earshot of coworkers, play the track above while you read this. It's worth it.  

Woven Wings has begun releasing wraps that include Yak fibres! I was lucky enough to get the prototype right off the loom! I did its first wash and its first several wears, which is what I will describe to you! Wraps transform the more they are used so bear in mind that my review describes how a brand new yak blend from Woven Wings (WW) will wrap. 

The Yak blends from WW are a blend of 3 fibres. They use a combination of Egyptian cotton (59-60%), ethically sourced merino (37-38%) and yak fibres (3%). Although 3% seems small, it makes a significant difference in they wrap versus the cotton/merino blends. I have used several of their merino wraps, and still use Blossom Geo (a merino blend) with my 2 year old. That said, I know more than one parent who stopped using the merino wraps because they wanted more support for their heavy babies, and they long for a return to the soft merino blends they enjoyed. These yak blends offer a solution to that problem! The small percentage of yak incorporporates a great deal of support in this wrap! This wrap is also significantly heavier than the merino geos.

(L to R) Ankalia Rubix Ink, WW Yak Prototype, Artipoppe Made In China Natty Hemp

(L to R) Ankalia Rubix Ink, WW Yak Prototype, Artipoppe Made In China Natty Hemp

I would clasify this wrap as a super-middleweight wrap as it's heavier than a middleweight, but definitely not a light-heavyweight. Its volume is not filled with weight, it has more fluff than poundage and make no mistake, it is fluffy. You can see here that it is significantly larger than an Ankalia Rubix Ink of the same length, which is of a heavier weight. This fluffiness adds comfort to your shoulders when wrapped. It's got cushion for the pushin'. A ruck is easily comfortable with 30 pounds wrapped up. WW wraps are narrower than most, which does very well with a fluffy wrap. The thick texture does not overwhelm your shoulders when properly wrapped (specifically, when sandwiched) partly thanks to the narrow width. 

Here you can see the hairy or fuzzy quality of Yak.

Here you can see the hairy or fuzzy quality of Yak.

The texture on the yak prototype is consistent, meaning that it does not vary with the different colours or stripes on the wrap. It absolutely includes a fuzzy texture throughout the entire wrap. Another word that could be used is hairy, though I would say the hair is tighter than a mohair blend. In fact, it is reminiscent of felted wool or tweed. The consistent texture means tightening multiple layers on a wrap more fluid, but the micro texture of the hairs secures the layers easily. They will not slip once tied off. This can be especially helpful with rambunctuous wrappees who use being wrapped as an opportunity to practice their future careers as bull riders. 

(L to R) Greenfinch (Egyptian cotton & linen); St. James's Park (Egyptian cotton, combed cotton & merino); Yak prototype (Egyptian cotton, merino & yak); Blossom (Egyptian cotton & merino)

(L to R) Greenfinch (Egyptian cotton & linen); St. James's Park (Egyptian cotton, combed cotton & merino); Yak prototype (Egyptian cotton, merino & yak); Blossom (Egyptian cotton & merino)

A fluffy and fuzzy wrap results in a fatter knot than thinner wraps. While knots can be made smaller by doing strand by strand tightening on the knot itself, this is not a wrap whose knot would be inconspicuous. I would also suggest a set of large sling rings, should you want to do a ring finish with the wrap. 

 

Each yak wrap will have a unique colourway but for the solid-coloured yak wraps, the warp colour of the wrap (in this case, dark brown) will be consistent throughout and leave little room for the weft (in this case, white) to show through. The colour will be rich and dominant. So dominant, really, that you will notice it on the reverse side. The reverse side won't be a crisp white, but that's okay. It will have a beautiful bleed-through. 

The colour of the yak geo is slightly more continuous than that of the merino blends. Yak Prototype & Blossom.

The colour of the yak geo is slightly more continuous than that of the merino blends.
Yak Prototype & Blossom.

The reverse side of the wrap is not a crisp white, but tinged with the warp colour. (T to B) St. James's Park, Yak Proto, Blossom

The reverse side of the wrap is not a crisp white, but tinged with the warp colour.
(T to B) St. James's Park, Yak Proto, Blossom

The size of the Geo pattern vary between blends, but they are identical between the yak and merino blends (as well as the combed cotton/merino blends).

The size of the Geo pattern vary between blends, but they are identical between the yak and merino blends (as well as the combed cotton/merino blends).

Woven Wings is a brand I am very familiar with and am friendly with the owners. I've done my best to ensure this review is unbiased. I was not paid to do this nor have I received any form of compensation including free product.

Brittney Pederson is a babywearing educator in Edmonton, Alberta. She does individual and group consults to help others learn how to use baby carriers, helps to develop baby carrier-friendly workouts, and plans the Canadian Babywearing Summit.